The Internet is not a Truck

Ted Stevens, Senator from Alaska, is at it again, this time arguing against Net Neutrality. The sad thing is, I’m sure he’s being totally honest about his opinion… he just doesn’t get the problem, thanks to the misinformation spread by the telcos.

an internet [I think he means email] was sent by my staff at 10 o’clock in the morning on Friday and I just got it yesterday. Why? Because it got tangled up with all these things going on the internet commercially.

Whoooh boy, is that the excuse the system administrators gave? I suppose “all these things going on the internet commercially” could mean “spam,” in which case, this explanation for the email delay might actually be true. Although, if the telcos are arguing that their approach will reduce spam… let’s just say I haven’t heard that lie yet.

Of course, it gets much better:

the internet is not something you just dump something on. It’s not a truck. It’s a series of tubes.

and even better:

Maybe there is a place for a commercial net but it’s not using what consumers use every day.

That really makes me sad. It’s yet another sign that a lot of our representatives making these important decisions are so far removed from the facts. They don’t even surf the web or buy things on Amazon. They somehow think that the Internet needs to be “enabled” so that commercial uses will arise.

Has it always been like this? Have we always had meaningless, stupid, fake debates about things so far removed from reality? Or is this a consequence of the super-fast evolution of new technologies? Or maybe the growing influence of lobbyists? I don’t know, but it’s sad.

4 thoughts on “The Internet is not a Truck

  1. I think that it’s always been this way. As we get more connected, we see more of how uninformed our “leaders” really are. In the middle ages, who knew who the King was, let alone what he was doing?!

    Now we get to know what our “superiors” are saying, so us geeks hear this idiocy, the chemists hear them not understanding chemistry, the medics hear them not understanding biology, the construction workers hear them not understanding their field, and so on.

    By definition, they live in a world of “Well I don’t know the details, but…”

  2. I think that it’s always been this way. As we get more connected, we see more of how uninformed our “leaders” really are. In the middle ages, who knew who the King was, let alone what he was doing?!

    Now we get to know what our “superiors” are saying, so us geeks hear this idiocy, the chemists hear them not understanding chemistry, the medics hear them not understanding biology, the construction workers hear them not understanding their field, and so on.

    By definition, they live in a world of “Well I don’t know the details, but…”

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